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Mozambique Popular Destinations

Medjumbe Island

, within the Quirimbas National Park. It is privately owned, operated as an exclusive resort. Accommodations are 13 thatched wooden chalets. The island is 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) long and 500 metres (1,600 ft) wide. It is surrounded by spectacular coral reefs. Tourist activities include diving and snorkeling, windsurfing and deep sea fishing.

Mozambique

Chinde

Chinde is a town of Mozambique, and a port for the Zambezi valley. It is located on the Chinde River, and is an important fishing center. It exports copra and sugar, and had a population of 16,500 in 1980. Chinde lies in Chinde District of Zambezia Province.

The small town of Chinde, located approximately 40 miles south of Quelimane, developed as the main point of entry for passengers and goods for the British Central Africa Protectorate which was proclaimed in 1891. Because of its favourable location on the Chinde River, part of the Zambezi River delta, it had potential for growth, and superseded both Quelimane and Conceicao as the most suitable port of entry .

Maputo, Mozambique

Vila Algarve

Vila Algarve is a residential house in the Mozambican capital Maputo. Built in 1934 and later protected as a listed building, the building housed the Portuguese secret police PIDE/DGS until the end of the Portuguese colonial period in Mozambique. It is located at the intersection of Avenida Martires da Machava and Avenida Ahmed Sekou Toure.

The building was erected in 1934 as a residence by Portuguese. Remarkable are the Azulejos, as a rare example of naturalistic decorated tiles from the time of the beginning of the twentieth century - alongside the Historicism architecture.

Maputo, Mozambique

Limpoppo National Park

The Limpopo National Park was born when the status of Coutada 16 Wildlife Utilisation Area in Gaza Province, Mozambique, was changed from a hunting concession to a protected area. It forms part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park with the Kruger National Park, South Africa and the Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe.

With the help of R42 million donated by Germany the new park is being developed with fencing and anti-poaching units. The park is divided up into three separate zones of use: a tourist zone, a wilderness zone, and a resource utilization zone (hunting). In the south is the Massingir dam and the town of Massingir which is the administrative headquarters of the new park while on the northern border is the Limpopo River.

The Limpopo park is part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, a 35,000 km² peace park that will link the Limpopo National Park], Kruger National Park in South Africa, Gonarezhou National Park, Manjinji Pan Sanctuary and Malipati Safari Area in Zimbabwe, as well as the area between Kruger and Gonarezhou, the Sengwe communal land in Zimbabwe and the Makuleke region in South Africa.

Maputo, Mozambique

Inhassoro

Inhassoro is a small fishing port in Inhassoro District of Inhambane Province in Mozambique. The town has about 43,000 inhabitants and is located on the Indian Ocean coast along the EN1 highway.

Inhassoro, which looks out at Bazaruto and Santa Carolina or Paradise Island is a developing tourist town. The population of Inhassoro is growing steadily as a result of the increase in tourism.

Several old hotels date back to colonial times. Hotel Seta is on the beach with chalets and a restaurant set beneath tall mahogany trees.

The bay off Inhassaro is popular with scuba divers with the reefs and the area is a seasonal home to many species of Dolphin, Turtle, the rare and endangered Dugong or Sea Cow, Whale sharks, Manta Rays and Humpback whales.

Maputo, Mozambique

Lake Amaramba

Lake Amaramba (Lago Amaramba) is a shallow lake in Mozambique, near the border with Malawi. Located in the Nyasa plateau, it is north of Lake Chiuta. The lakes are separated by a sandy ridge and a channel links the two lakes. On the western side of the channel, the connecting waterway is known as the River Msambiti while on the eastern side, it is known as the Lugenda River. Lake Amaramba is intermittently linked to the Lugenda River, a tributary of the Ruvuma River.

Flora and Fauna:
The lake system (both Chiuta and Amaramba) had in the past very rich wild life but during the civil war suffered severe poaching and hunting. Aqua fauna in the lake also suffered due to overfishing caused by migrants from Malawi. Following this destruction, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Oxfam GB initiated measures to stop the illegal practices. A participatory approach involving people of the area, the local and provincial government and the Coastal Security Commission, was evolved to address the adverse ecological aspects created in the past, with the objective of enhancing production from the lake system without resorting to overuse of the resources of the lake.

Maputo, Mozambique

Praca Da Independecia

Praca da Independenciaa (Independence Square) is a public square and focal point of Maput, Mozambique. It was built by the Portuguese as Praca Mouzinho de Albuquerque (Mouzinho de Albuquerque Square) and was dominated by a statue of Mouzinho de Albuquerque, the former governor-general of Portuguese Mozambique. The statue of Mouzinho on horseback was inaugurated in 1940. After the independence of Mozambique in 1975 the square was renamed Praca da Independencia, and the statue of Mouzinho de Albuquerque was removed to Fortaleza de Nossa Senhora da Conceicao and replaced by a statue of Samora Machel (1933-1986), the first president of Mozambique. The square is now dominated by the much larger Samora Machel Statue, which was built and dedicated in 2011.

Praca da Independencia is flanked to the north by the Maputo City Hal land to the east by Cathredal of Our Lady of the immaculate conception. Iron House, designed by Gustave Eiffel for the governor of Mozambique, is located just off the square. Tunduru Gardens, designed in 1885 by British gardener Thomas Honney, is located one block south of the square.

Maputo, Mozambique

Mount Mabu

Mount Mabu is a mountain in northern Mozambique, famous for its old-growth rainforest. Mount Mabu is approximately 1,700 metres (5,600 feet) high and the forest covers about 7,000 hectares (27 square miles). While well-known locally, the Mount Mabu forest and its extremely diverse wildlife were unknown to plant and animal scientists until 2005. It was "discovered" by scientists from Kew Royal Botanic Gardens by browsing Google Earth's satellite view to look for potential unknown wildlife hotspots in Africa. It is frequently referred to as the "Google Forest".

Several new species have been discovered in the Mount Mabu forest. The isolation of the rainforest, surrounded by savannah, makes it likely that it is host to many previously undiscovered species.

Other newly discovered species include four butterflies, two more species of snakes, a species of crab, and five plants. There are likely many more new species in the forest, with likely candidates so far including a shrew, a pseudo-scorpion, frogs, snails, bats, catfish, and various insects.

Among 126 species of birds identified, there are seven new populations of globally threatened species of birds in the forest, including the Thyolo alethe, whose other populations are all threatened by logging and deforestation. Others include Swynnerton's robin and Namuli apalis.

In June 2009, the Mozambique government announced that they would establish conservation measures to prevent commercial logging. The Mabu forest is believed to be the largest medium-altitude rainforest in Africa.[10] African forests that are unspoiled by logging and other human activity are rare. The Mount Mabu forest is surrounded by areas devastated by the Mozambican Civil War (1977-1992). Poor road access, ignorance of the forest, and its use as a refuge for local villagers during the war all contributed to its protection. No records of previous expeditions or collecting trips have been discovered.

Maputo, Mozambique

Zavala

Zavala, also known as Quissico, is a city in Mozambique. It is the capital of the Zavala District.

The town lies on the Mozambique Channel coast and the EN1 road. It is known for its lagoons and for its musicianship.

The Chopi ethnic group is numerous in Zavala. Famous people from Zavala include Alexandre José Maria dos Santos, a Cardinal who was Archbishop of Maputo; the artist Kester and Venancio Mbande.

Maputo, Mozambique

Manica Province

Manica is a province of Mozambique. It has an area of 62,272 sq km and a population of 1,412,245 (2007 census). The province is surrounded by Zimbabwe in the west, Tete Province in the northwest, Sofala Province in the east, Save River in the south, and Zambezi river in the northeast. Chimoio is the capital of the province. The highest mountain in Mozambique, Mount Binga (2436 m), lies in this province near the border with Zimbabwe. The Manica province is divided into nine districts and 34 administrative regions.

Maputo, Mozambique